Ten Little Indians or How I met Agatha Christie

Ranked #5,833 in Books, Poetry & Writing, #138,232 overall

The book was first published in U.K. as Ten Little Niggers. After it came to U.S. someone decided to change it into Ten Little Indians to make it more American. Years later, somebody else realized than none of the titles was intriguing enough and this is how the latest version appears - And Then There Were None.

I read it under the original title when I was 17, and had never imagined that I would love it so much. I wasn't exactly a big fan of detective books, but this one opened my appetite for everything that means murders, murderers and mysteries.

The first think that caught my attention was the main plot point – the little song for children. I read it before and it seemed completely innocent; I read it after and it turned into a series of lyrics with evil, hidden meanings.

The beginning was a little unrealistic and stodgy for me because I would have never done what the characters did, but after the first murder I entirely forgot about my second thoughts. I focused on all the things that seemed like clues to me, I made a mental list with three potential criminals and when the moment of truth came I found out that… I was wrong. That hurt bad!

Being a little spoiled and stubborn, I had a huge confidence in all my choices. And there is this lady who writes a few books and makes me look stupid. I threw the book away and went to opinions hunting. Fortunately for me, almost all of my friends were book lovers and had read at least one of Christie's novels. They told me the exactly same thing: that woman wrote every sentence in such a mysterious and thorough way that you will rarely guess the end.

I felt a lot better after hearing these things, my self-esteem increased back and I gave her books another chance. I read about four or five (my intuition was wrong every time, of course) and then I got bored and returned to my beloved romances.

I think Agatha Christie is one of the greatest authors of all the time who worked colossally on writing her novels that will remain in history for many, many years. I'd love to read them all, but I'm afraid I'll turn into a psycho who sees blood and dead bodies everywhere. I'm kidding, I just can't picture myself giving up on my favorite authors.

"But no artist, I now realize, can be satisfied with art alone. There is a natural craving for recognition which cannot be gain-said."
- Agatha Christie, "Ten Little Indians"

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Comments

Tell me what you think about Agatha Christie and mystery books!

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  • favored1 Feb 17, 2014 @ 5:32 pm
    Thanks for this information about AC books. I didn't realize that this has had three titles.
  • carknack Feb 13, 2014 @ 2:58 am
    I haven't read any A.C. books in years, but your review has brought them back to mind and I shall revisit them soon, thank you.
  • andreea22 Feb 13, 2014 @ 8:16 am
    I'm glat to hear this, thank you for your visit!
  • Ruthi Feb 11, 2014 @ 5:11 pm
    I am not big on reading murder and mystery mayhem but the Queen of Mystery is always able to draw me in. You have written an interesting and informative personal review of one of her great reads, And Then There Were None.
  • andreea22 Feb 12, 2014 @ 10:24 am
    Me neither, but Agatha Christie has a wonderful style of writting. Thank you for your thoughts! :)
  • CarolHoule Feb 10, 2014 @ 7:32 pm
    I discard books if the author doesn't draw me in after the second chapter. (to library, homes, hospitals). I'm very particular about the "catch". If a book doesn't catch me at all in the first chapter or second chapter I skim the next.
    Personally, I focus on this "catch" when I start writing a book. I start right in the middle of an interesting situation, rather than explain, explain, set the tone the environment, describe everyone at length >there's plenty of time later. What they teach at universities might be old-school compared to today's technology. So run with it. Jump in with both feet!
    Andrea, me too, I can't look at or read too much 'yuck', yet I must say that, I was driven to read this lens. You're a very good writer and storyteller. Excellent job!
  • andreea22 Feb 11, 2014 @ 8:39 am
    I do exactly the same! As I have a long must-read list, I can't afford to lose time with a book that haven't catched me from the first pages. I used to blame the fact that we're living in the century of speed, but now I don't think that anymore.
    I've checked some of your books on Amazon and read their descriptions. They seem to be interesting and catching, especially. Right now I have to read a lot of books for a course and that will keep me busy for a couple of months, but after I finish it I promise I'll read Breaking the Protocol - until now, it's my favorite. I'll let you know when this happens. :)
    Thank you so much for stopping by and your kind words!
  • susan369 Feb 09, 2014 @ 7:20 am
    Hey, great review! I've got this on my Kindle waiting to be read! I remember seeing the film when I was a teenager. No wonder they changed the title from the original. Publishing a book today with that title would be unthinkable!
  • andreea22 Feb 09, 2014 @ 8:17 am
    I saw the movie too, years later after reading the book and I don't remember it as a good one. About the title, I'm pretty sure I would have read it sooner if it had been entitled And Then There Were None. Ten Little Niggers/Indians doesn't inspire me a promising novel.
  • Merrci Feb 09, 2014 @ 7:06 am
    Your lens inspires me to read a book or two by her again. It's been so long I can't remember that I read many of them. It is fun when you think you know, then it turns out you're wrong. Makes me want to go back and see what I missed!
  • andreea22 Feb 09, 2014 @ 8:20 am
    I think it'd be fun re-reading Ten Little Niggers and see what I missed. I hope you get to read some of her books and maybe review them here on Squidoo. :)
  • carlyflames Feb 08, 2014 @ 11:56 pm
    Awesome review and totally inspiring me to review Agatha (though I might go the movie route rather than the book route) but I love her books as well. I just happen to curse a lot at the end when I didn't realize whodunnit. My grandma is VERY good at guessing who did what and I hate her for it.. HAHA
  • andreea22 Feb 09, 2014 @ 5:04 am
    Your grandma is a genius! I wish I had her intuition. Let me know when you finish your Agatha review, I'd love to read it.
  • Charito1962 Feb 08, 2014 @ 10:50 pm
    Great review! My favorite Agatha Christie mystery is "Murder on the Orient Express".
  • andreea22 Feb 09, 2014 @ 5:02 am
    I haven't read that one, but I heard it's one of the best. I'll try it someday.
  • adventuretravelshop Feb 08, 2014 @ 7:25 pm
    I get really fed up if I guess correctly - ruin the whole book - however to be honest I've never actually done that lol! Nice review.
  • andreea22 Feb 09, 2014 @ 5:01 am
    I have a great satisfaction when I guess corectly, even though my favorite books are the ones with a totally unforeseeable end. Thanks for stopping by. :)
  • partybuzz Feb 08, 2014 @ 3:13 pm
    I love Agatha Christie books! I remember reading this in the Then There Were None version. I can never guess who did it, either. Great review.
  • andreea22 Feb 09, 2014 @ 4:57 am
    Thank you!
  • DaisyDixon Feb 08, 2014 @ 11:53 am
    Great review, I know that happens to me a lot as well I'll think I know for SURE who the murderer is and then It's somebody totally unexpected or I'm wrong.
  • andreea22 Feb 08, 2014 @ 12:00 pm
    Now, I actually like when this happens. That means the book is very well written.
  • tonyleather Feb 08, 2014 @ 8:37 am
    She was such a wonderfully inventive writer, and I never tire of reading her books!
  • andreea22 Feb 08, 2014 @ 9:05 am
    Yes, she was. I love her style!